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Posts tagged "treatment"
Civil Society Capacity Building for DR-TB Regional Meeting

Civil Society Capacity Building for DR-TB Regional Meeting

When new, effective medicines providing safe treatment for widespread debilitating diseases, it is vitally important to ensure that everyone who needs such medicines has access to them. It was with this aim therefore that TBEC held a regional meeting on civil society capacity building for DR-TB. Existing TB treatments are incredibly gruelling for the patient, but medical innovations (shorter or safer treatments, new medicines, or more exact methods of diagnosis) can genuinely relieve a patient’s suffering. But what use are such innovations if patients aren’t able to access them? What use are new medicines if there’s no way for hospitals to buy them or any way to prescribe that they are needed? Any measurement of the success of innovative treatments has to be countered by an assessment of their accessibility. When everyone has access to new treatments, we can start to talk about how successful they are. Guidelines on DR-TB Treatment The recent WHO recommendations on drug-resistant TB (DR-TB) are the first in a long time that provide a genuine possibility to start to improve the treatment of DR-TB by using innovative and more effective medicines with less debilitating side effects. It is therefore vital that we do not waste time; More…

Study finds fake and poorly made drugs being used in the fight against tuberculosis

Study finds fake and poorly made drugs being used in the fight against tuberculosis

The fight against tuberculosis (TB) is being made more difficult as a result of the use of substandard and fake medication to treat the disease, a new study has revealed. In the biggest-ever study of its kind, researchers collected samples of two frontline anti-TB drugs (isoniazid and rifampicin) from pharmacies and local markets in 17 countries, including some in Europe. Worryingly, from these collected samples almost one in ten drugs failed to meet basic quality standards while around half of these had no active ingredient (the molecule that destroys the TB bacteria) whatsoever. The reasons for the existence of such poor quality drugs are wide-ranging. While it was discovered that some fake antibiotics were introduced into the markets by criminal enterprises , perhaps what is most shocking is that the vast majority actually came from legitimate manufacturers. These were just so poorly made they were ineffective or had corroded in transport. In order for TB treatment to be effective it is crucial that TB patients are able to access and are given the correct medication for the correct period of time. However, for many this involves a significant cost, both in travelling to supervised or accredited clinics and in purchasing More…

Take That TB!

Take That TB!

A group from around Europe and Australia have established a website that seeks to build a meeting area ‘From Patients For Patients’. The group of former patients created the site, Take That TB, with the intention of making it easier for greater exchange of difficulties and successes between patients and for improved discussion about their experiences with TB. The site also serves as a chatroom for those in isolation. In the fight against TB it is so important for former patients and current patients alike to share their stories and experiences. As is stated on the website: ‘TB does not only have a weak face or a poor face, TB has many faces and many languages and can be found everywhere in the world. We want to show that cured TB can help people become strong.’  While taking action in order to push for better diagnostics and treatment is undoubtedly crucial and necessary, it is equally important that those who are suffering find the support networks needed to help combat not only their TB but also TB throughout the world. By offering this support, the site will also help raise awareness and remove the stigma surrounding TB in a range of communities More…

First TB information center opens in Lithuania

First TB information center opens in Lithuania

The first “stop TB” information center opened in Lithuania last week. The center opened in order to provide valuable psychological counselling to both patients and their loved ones, pulmonologist advice, along with general information about TB.

'Overcoming Tuberculosis' Booklet released in Russian

‘Overcoming Tuberculosis’ Booklet released in Russian

Overcoming Tuberculosis by Paul Thorn – a booklet designed to help people undergoing TB treatment understand the nature of the illness and cope well with it – has been translated into Russian and adapted for the sociocultural context of Central Asia.

Strong Advocacy Needed to Eliminate TB as a Major Killer of Children

Strong Advocacy Needed to Eliminate TB as a Major Killer of Children

Although a preventable and curable disease, TB makes up a considerable burden of disease affecting children. The WHO estimates that half a million children get sick with TB each year and up to 64,000 die as a result. However, most childhood TB researchers believe these figures represent a gross underestimation of the true problem as there is little data available on TB in children. Children are often left out of National TB Control Programmes because they tend to be less infectious than adults. Many health service providers also mistakenly consider TB to be an ‘adult’ disease. Because TB’s symptoms are often confused with symptoms of other common childhood diseases like pneumonia(treatment which can be carried out with the help of these tablets), children with TB are frequently misdiagnosed. Failing to deal with childhood TB cases means failing to address a reservoir of infection for future TB cases. We need strong advocacy to ensure that childhood TB does not remain a neglected issue. Diagnosing TB in children:  Children are more likely to have TB in places other than in their lungs (e.g. TB in the lymph nodes). Because of this, children are also much more difficult to identify. TB is usually diagnosed by taking a sputum sample More…

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