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Posts tagged "stigma"
What can be done to counter TB stigma?

What can be done to counter TB stigma?

What’s it like to have TB? David Bryden, the Stop TB Officer at Results Educational Fund, had the opportunity to speak with two  inspiring TB nurses while he was at the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (IUATLD) Conference last year about their own experiences with TB and TB stigma. “It’s very difficult, because often you feel alone.”  Tania Monteiro, a nurse from Portugal, speaks about her own bout with TB and her 14-month treatment period and gives insight into where TB stigma comes from. She talks about why it is so important that TB patients not only receive treatment but are also given care, support and information about the disease.   “Stigma is one of the most important issues affecting TB management efforts.” Gini Williams, a TB nurse who runs a training programme for nurses through the International Council of Nurses, describes how crucial it is to train nurses to lessen stigma. Gini describes how deeply embedded TB stigma is, even among nurses, and how training is necessary to debunk this stigma.  

New report highlights the urgent need for action on childhood tuberculosis

New report highlights the urgent need for action on childhood tuberculosis

A new report, Children and Tuberculosis: From Neglect to Action, outlining recommendations on how the international community and affected countries can combat childhood TB was released today by the ACTION global health advocacy partnership.  Despite the international community paying increasing attention to the issue of childhood tuberculosis and despite it being both preventable and treatable, TB remains a top ten killer of children worldwide. The WHO estimates 490,000 children get sick with TB each year, and up to 64,000 die as a result – although experts agree that actual figures are much higher. The report highlights the various issues facing children, predominantly the most vulnerable living in poverty, with TB. Not only are children prime targets given that their immune systems are not fully developed but the risk is further exacerbated by the lack of any appropriate, quality-assured paediatric TB drug formulations. As the report states: Drug companies perceive paediatric TB to be a small market with little profit. As a result, children are routinely excluded from drug treatment clinical trials and few child-friendly TB drugs exists, such as liquids or chewable tablets. In addition to the lack of child-friendly diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines, children are often overlooked or misdiagnosed in National TB Programmes. More…

The Burden of TB on Women: A Call to Action

The Burden of TB on Women: A Call to Action

“All my problems started with tuberculosis. I can say that tuberculosis destroyed my family since my father became ill… He was sick in the hospital a lot, my mom was by herself with no money… My family struggled, got in a lot of debt, which in a few years led to their not having a home… They were left on the street because of tuberculosis.”  Mariana, Bucharest, Romania This post is brought to you by Jonathan Stillo, an anthropologist who has been researching TB in Romania since 2006. He has interviewed over 100 patients as well as dozens of doctors and NGO representatives, visited numerous hospitals and sanatoria and even lived at one large sanatorium for several months. Jonathan tells the following stories of two young Romanian women and their experiences with TB. Women in Romania face special challenges when they or a loved one becomes infected with tuberculosis (TB). When women contract TB, they are often forced to choose between the welfare of their families and their own health.  Frequently, it is the work of caring for a sick relative, such as a father or husband, which first exposes Romanian women to TB.  Once infected, it becomes much more More…

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