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Posts tagged "MFF"
TBEC Participation in the EU HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis and Tuberculosis Civil Society Forum Meeting

TBEC Participation in the EU HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis and Tuberculosis Civil Society Forum Meeting

The biannual face-to-face meeting of the EU HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis and Tuberculosis Civil Society Forum (CSF) took place on 17-18 June in Luxembourg. The forum has been established by the European Commission to facilitate the participation of European NGOs in policy development and implementation, as well as in information exchange activities. Initially established as a forum for HIV/AIDS civil society, in 2017 the EU Civil Society Forum was extended to include hepatitis and tuberculosis NGOs, which allowed TBEC to formally become a CSF member. During the meeting, CSF members, including TBEC, provided updates on their work and discussed upcoming opportunities and challenges. TBEC also facilitated several sessions focused on political advocacy towards the EU. Since the last meeting in November 2018, the EU Civil Society Forum has been involved in a variety of advocacy activities. The Advocacy and Policy Working Group, coordinated by TBEC Board member Marine Ejuryan, has particularly focused its activities on ensuring that health is prioritised in the next EU long-term budget, the Multi-annual Financial Framework (MFF), as well as making sure that health stays high on the agenda of the new EU Commission and Parliament after the EU elections in May. During the meeting, CSF members agreed More…

European Parliament approve EU Budget and R&D Programme for 2014-2020

European Parliament approve EU Budget and R&D Programme for 2014-2020

After months of ongoing negotiations, the European Parliament formally approved two central pieces of legislation for the European Union this week. Deals were reached both on the Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF – or the EU Budget) and for Horizon 2020 (the EU’s programme for research and innovation). The MFF for 2014-2020 totals about €960 billion, which, in real terms, is €34 billion less than compared to the previous financial period (2007-2013). Of particular concern for us is the news that ‘Heading 4’ – this is the category under which development spending falls – has experienced an overall cut of 16% compared to the European Commission’s initial proposal. The EU instrument for development assistance – the Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI) was reduced to €17.36 billion. Despite these overall cuts for 2014-2020, for the 2014 budget the European Parliament did approve an increase for the DCI. Moreover, they made sure that at least 20% of appropriations of the DCI should be used for basic social services and that there must be the creation of a separate budget line for Human Development. This will mention sexual and reproductive health, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and other poverty related diseases. The Horizon 2020 programme which finances More…

EU moves one step closer to finalising 2014-2020 budget

EU moves one step closer to finalising 2014-2020 budget

In February, EU heads of states met in Brussels to finally agree on a deal for the next seven years of spending in the Multi-Annual Financial Framework (MFF)- otherwise known as the EU budget. This agreement was notable for being the first time that total funding is lower than in the previous period, with real term cuts of around 3.6%. Thought it is worth mentioning that the section of the budget devoted to EU external action – Heading 4  (which includes money put towards EU aid) – was frozen rather than cut. At the time many made clear their dissapointment with this announcement with particular concern surrounding the fact that the freeze would make it harder to reach the millenium development goals and the 0.7% target. Now, after months of negotiation with Member States (the “Council”), the European Parliament has endorsed the MFF. During this time MEPs did achieve some of the things they were aiming for. Most notably, greater flexibility, allowing for more of the money to spent sooner in the period 2014-2020 and also a binding requirement on the European Commission and the European Parliament to review the budget mid-term. What hasn’t changed is the amount of money devoted to EU eternal action (and, More…

MEPs unhappy with EU budget deal

MEPs unhappy with EU budget deal

As we mentioned in our blogpost on Wednesday, the leaders of the 27 member states finally reached an agreement on the next 7 years of funding for the EU budget. While President Van Rompuy concluded the meeting stating that the final budget is both balanced and growth-oriented, MEPs disagree. One area for particular concern is the impact that the agreement will have on research and innovation and, in particular, Horizon 2020. Initially, the Commission had proposed  €80 billion but this has now been slashed to  €70.96 billion. Research and innovation is crucial when it comes to tackling TB and other poverty-related and neglected diseases which urgently need improved treatment and medicines in order to save millions of lives each year. Parliamentarians in the EU are now vowing to block any budget cuts at all for research and innovation, something that will not only helps save lives in the future but that is also seen to be important for economic growth. For many, the real negotiations for the EU budget start now. You can read more on this story by clicking here.  

European Union leaders reach deal on EU budget

European Union leaders reach deal on EU budget

Last week 27 EU heads of state met in Brussels to finally agree a deal on the next 7 years of spending in the Multi-Annual Financial Framework – otherwise known as the EU Budget. The agreement is notable for being the first time that total funding is lower than in the previous period, with real term cuts of around 3.7%. Funding for development aid, which we have often mentioned in this blog as a great success story of previous EU budgets, has been frozen. While this may seem good news, many are disappointed with the outcome. Significantly, it is believed, by organisations such as ONE, that ‘EU leaders missed their opportunity to take Europe a big step closer to its promise of spending 0.7 percent of income on smart aid’. The Overseas Development Institute has also analysed the impact of the budget on the 0.7 percent target. They note that by deciding to effectively freeze the aid budget they remain further than ever from honouring their commitment to the world’s poorest people. You can read their analysis in more detail here. Despite these less-than-hopeful messages, some positives can be taken from the agreement reached last week. As ONE suggest, the fact that their wasn’t More…

MEPs call on UK government to support EU humanitarian and development aid

MEPs call on UK government to support EU humanitarian and development aid

Last week, in an open letter to The Guardian newspaper, a cross-party group of MEPs have stated that the European Union’s cut to the global aid budget is disproportionate. The group, that includes Michael Cashman, Keith Taylor, Nirj Deva and Fiona Hall, note that David Cameron has said we should not balance our books on the backs of the poorest people on the planet. As the group asserts: Turning Cameron’s rhetoric into reality requires protection development and humanitarian aid from the real-terms freeze the UK government is proposing for the EU budget. Without this protection, poor countries could miss out on £8bn to tackle poverty and help people hit by natural disasters. Highlighting the issue, the letter makes note of the fact that budget negotiations have reduced the amounts allocated to aid for 2014-2020 by about 10%. We agree with the calls made by the MEPs that this reduction is ‘simply unacceptable’, particularly because aid is bearing a disproportionate cut. The common agricultural policy budget, for example, would be cut only by 6.5%. As has been iterated many of our blog posts and as is stated in The Guardian letter, EU aid to the poorest nations is recognised by the More…

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