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Posts tagged "civil society organisations"
Moldovan CSOs join together to help defeat TB

Moldovan CSOs join together to help defeat TB

On 17th May 2013, seven civil society organisations in Moldova have recently come together to found the ‘National Platform of CSOs active in the field of TB control’. The group was formed in order to ensure that individual organisations working at a community level could harness their collective¬†energy¬†and have a significant positive impact at a national level. The platform have a number of plans for the future, the immediate of which are: the elaboration of the Platform’s Strategic Plan for 2013-2016; and appointment of the Platform’s representative within the Country Coordination Mechanism on National TB and HIV/AIDS control and prophylaxis programmes. The overall mission of the group is to defeat TB in the Republic of Moldova. They plan to do this through the consolidation of efforts of CSOs in order to increase the accountability of communities and the governmental sector, to develop services centered on TB patients and to carry out common advocacy activities. Along with their immediate plans, during the next four years the platform will concentrate on the following strategic objectives: Improving the access to diagnosis and treatment of persons with TB, especially those from vulnerable groups: homeless people, IDUs, ex-inmates and persons living below the poverty level; More…

Wolfheze Workshops 2013

Wolfheze Workshops 2013

From 29th – 31st May, The Hague will place host to the 16th Wolfheze Workshops 2013. These workshops aim to strengthen tuberculosis (TB) control in the World Health Organisation (WHO) European Region, with an emphasis on sharing experiences and discussing progress and plans for development of Region specific guidance based on a consensus-building approach. The workshops allow for national TB programme managers, health authorities, laboratory experts, national TB surveillance correspondents, civil society organisations and other partners to discuss achievements, challenges and ways forward. This year, the programme focuses on the progrress made since the Berlin Declaration in 2007, the launch of the ECDC Framework Action Plan to Fight Tuberculosis in the European Union in 2008, and the Consolidated Action Plan to Prevent and Combat Multi-drug- and Extensively-drug resistant (M/XDR-TB) in the WHO European Region in 2011. The event will also cover progress on diagnosis, treatment and models of care, enhanced case-finding within high risk settings, extrapulmonary TB, TB among vulnerable populations, including migrants and prisoners, childhood TB, and the role of civil society. Given that the role of civil society is key in the fight against TB, this year the workshops aim to have a much bigger CSO presence. There More…

Tackling TB in Moldova: Speranta Terrei and the importance of civil society organisations

Tackling TB in Moldova: Speranta Terrei and the importance of civil society organisations

The Republic of Moldova has a considerable TB problem. In 2011, out of a population of 3 million, 4,208 people were diagnosed with TB. Compare this to the 3,528 people diagnosed with TB in Germany, out of a population of 82 million, and the alarming rate of TB in Moldova really hits home. Moreover, Moldovan has a high burden of multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) that makes tackling the problem significantly more difficult. 19 percent of all new cases of TB in Moldova are estimated to be MDR and 51 percent of all retreated cases. To add to the problem, Moldova is also a predominantly rural country. This not only makes carrying out national TB prevention programmes much harder, but it also increases the chances of patients not being able to complete treatment as a result of having to travel much longer distances to reach treatment than those who live in cities. Some patients are also too weak to walk far or even lack money for a bus fare to take a trip to a dispensary. If treatment isn’t completed or stopped early drug-resistant strains can emerge, thus further compounding the problem of MDR-TB. There are, however, civil society organisations that More…

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