Close it

Would you like to become a TBEC member? Please fill out the form below.

By becoming a TBEC member, you agree to endorse the values and the principles of the TB Europe Coalition, and agree with its membership rights and responsibilities.

Membership is free of charge.

TBEC membership rights

TBEC membership responsibilities












Conferences & Events
TBEC Participation in the EU HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis and Tuberculosis Civil Society Forum Meeting

TBEC Participation in the EU HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis and Tuberculosis Civil Society Forum Meeting

The biannual face-to-face meeting of the EU HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis and Tuberculosis Civil Society Forum (CSF) took place on 17-18 June in Luxembourg. The forum has been established by the European Commission to facilitate the participation of European NGOs in policy development and implementation, as well as in information exchange activities. Initially established as a forum for HIV/AIDS civil society, in 2017 the EU Civil Society Forum was extended to include hepatitis and tuberculosis NGOs, which allowed TBEC to formally become a CSF member. During the meeting, CSF members, including TBEC, provided updates on their work and discussed upcoming opportunities and challenges. TBEC also facilitated several sessions focused on political advocacy towards the EU. Since the last meeting in November 2018, the EU Civil Society Forum has been involved in a variety of advocacy activities. The Advocacy and Policy Working Group, coordinated by TBEC Board member Marine Ejuryan, has particularly focused its activities on ensuring that health is prioritised in the next EU long-term budget, the Multi-annual Financial Framework (MFF), as well as making sure that health stays high on the agenda of the new EU Commission and Parliament after the EU elections in May. During the meeting, CSF members agreed More…

Civil Society Capacity Building for DR-TB Regional Meeting

Civil Society Capacity Building for DR-TB Regional Meeting

When new, effective medicines providing safe treatment for widespread debilitating diseases, it is vitally important to ensure that everyone who needs such medicines has access to them. It was with this aim therefore that TBEC held a regional meeting on civil society capacity building for DR-TB. Existing TB treatments are incredibly gruelling for the patient, but medical innovations (shorter or safer treatments, new medicines, or more exact methods of diagnosis) can genuinely relieve a patient’s suffering. But what use are such innovations if patients aren’t able to access them? What use are new medicines if there’s no way for hospitals to buy them or any way to prescribe that they are needed? Any measurement of the success of innovative treatments has to be countered by an assessment of their accessibility. When everyone has access to new treatments, we can start to talk about how successful they are. Guidelines on DR-TB Treatment The recent WHO recommendations on drug-resistant TB (DR-TB) are the first in a long time that provide a genuine possibility to start to improve the treatment of DR-TB by using innovative and more effective medicines with less debilitating side effects. It is therefore vital that we do not waste time; More…

‘WOLFHEZE’: What is it? What happened?

‘WOLFHEZE’: What is it? What happened?

Once every two years in May, many leading lights of TB care in the WHO Europe Region talk of going off to ‘Wolfheze’. Well, if you explore a detailed map of the Netherlands, you will find that Wolfheze itself is a tiny village in the woods on the Eastern side of the country. It is where the very first of a continuing series of meetings took place about 25 years ago. The name has stuck but the meetings since have mostly taken place in or near The Hague; this year in Scheveningen, the city’s seaside resort and suburb. The organisers are a triumvirate of KNCV, ECDC, and WHO Europe plus, on the planning committees, representatives of other parties including TBEC. The hard core of the 200 or so participants are NTP Managers but with many other interested partners. Following pressure in past years, it is now accepted that there have to be plenty of civil society people there, not just present but being among the many speakers, session co-ordinators, and reporters. In practice because of its small size, it is a relatively informal gathering of people from both low and high burden countries of the Region, and a great opportunity More…

TBEC attends 13th meeting of the Technical Advisory Group for Tuberculosis (TAG-TB) for the WHO European Region

TBEC attends 13th meeting of the Technical Advisory Group for Tuberculosis (TAG-TB) for the WHO European Region

On April 9–10, the Co-Chair of TBEC Board and the TBEC Advocacy and Policy Manager attended the 13th Meeting of the European Technical Advisory Group on Tuberculosis (TAG-TB). Throughout two days, TAG-TB members discussed: the latest TB data: 3.6 million people with TB are still not diagnosed; need to strengthen government officials’ capacity to fight TB; importance of working with key groups and especially with migrants; it was announced that at the end of 2019, new recommendations for MDR-TB treatment will be issued; the need for advocacy for tests to define resistance to the 2nd line of drugs, especially to new ones such as Bedaquiline and Delamanid, etc; the need to develop recommendations for the treatment of latent TB, because there are goals after United Nations High-Level Meeting on Tuberculosis (UN HLM on TB) that will not be achievable if there are no recommendations; the need for advocacy for more UN HLMs that will be related to specific health diseases (such as TB, HIV, etc), as it was announced that the UN HLM on TB was the last meeting dedicated to a specific disease. Further meetings will be confined to the general topic of public health. Among other subjects, a specific More…

TBEC's first-ever workshop in the Balkan region

TBEC’s first-ever workshop in the Balkan region

Although TBEC covers all 53 WHO Europe region countries, it is no secret that the majority of the TBEC’s advocacy and capacity building activities are focused on 18 high priority countries in the region, specifically, the Baltic states, Romania, Bulgaria and Eastern Europe and Central Asia region. So much so that it was not particularly surprising that as part of the TBEC member skills analysis and annual membership surveys, TBEC received numerous invitations from its few members in the region to visit and engage pro-actively in TB care in the Balkan countries. Thus, when an opportunity to organise a joint capacity building workshop with the European Respiratory Society (ERS) presented itself, TBEC was keen to take a chance and use it for a slightly “experimental” regional workshop in Zagreb, Croatia.  As often happens, the “experiment” paid off tenfold, and on 16-17 April, TBEC together with ERS successfully held the first-ever regional workshop in the region on “Enhancing TB advocacy, people-centred care and collaboration in TB care between civil society organisations and healthcare professionals across the Balkan states”. For TBEC, it was a workshop with a lot of “First-Evers”: 1) the first time TBEC had ever partnered with ERS to organize More…

Estonian Network of PLWH has carried out World Tuberculosis Day event

Estonian Network of PLWH has carried out World Tuberculosis Day event

On 24th of March 2016, Estonian Network of PLWH has carried out World Tuberculosis Day event, which was celebrated with the message «Unite to end TB» Jõhvi and Kohtla-Järve. HIV express testing was organized in Kohtla-Järve. During the event, our volunteers visited inpatient tuberculosis department at Ida-Viru Central Hospital, Infectious Department at East Tallinn Central Hospital. Also a big training was organized in Jõhvi for Network volunteers and workers of rehab and social centers about HIV and TB. The trainers were Rein Sikut, cell biologist (GSK) and Veronika Ilyina, Head of the Pulmonary Department of Ida-Viru hospital. In total 50 volunteers participated, 3000 condoms, 2000 leaflets was spread. We would like to thank healthcare company GSK, AHF Foundation, OÜ Corrigo for their support in organizing and holding events. We thank all those, who participated in “Create a daisy with your own hands!” contest. We would like to express special thanks to Sillamäe house Sillamäe house and day center for people with special needs, Kohtla-Jarve and also youth center „Kohtla-Järve Noortekeskus”. For more information (in English and Russian) please visit Facebook or click here: World TB Day Article written by Estonian Network of PLWH This blog is the product of an activity More…

TB Europe Coalition holds first ever Member General Assembly

TB Europe Coalition holds first ever Member General Assembly

This week, the TB Europe Coalition hosted our first ever member-wide General Assembly. The General Assembly, held virtually, was an opportunity to share and discuss the TB Europe Coalition’s development and recent activities with the broader TBEC membership in order to foster greater participation in the network.Specifically, the call presented an opportunity to review recent TBEC activities, to present a member case study and to provide an update on future TBEC activities. Two calls were held highlighting the increasing efforts being made by the TBEC Secretariat to communicate with our members in English and Russian, recognising these as two of the most widely spoken languages of the region. During the review of recent activities, we presented our new and improving website that allows for members to more effectively input into the growth and direction of TBEC. This website development includes: A calendar of events  – you can view this for any relevant events and can also send through information on events you are putting on that can be included in the calendar. Membership Forum – this will be a forum where you can discuss issues with other individuals in the region, can ask questions and network virtually with others. We hope More…

Economic Growth and TB in the context of the BRICS.

Economic Growth and TB in the context of the BRICS.

The BRICS, namely Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa were bundled together by dint of their impressive growth rates, lifting swathes of the population out of poverty and increasing their economic weight in the world economy. With a combined population of 3 billion and a combined GDP of 16 trillion USD, these countries have the potential to shape international relations and shift global trends in their favour be it in the field of finance, security or health.[1] TB is a disease all five countries are currently battling with, carrying 60% of the world’s TB burden.[2] With 9 million newly diagnosed cases annually and 3 million slipping through national health care systems, it is evident that BRICS initiatives will make or break international efforts to curb TB levels.[3] In India alone, there are 2 million TB sufferers, which makes it the highest burden country in the world and a focal point of global TB prevention activity.[4] The prevalence of MDR-TB in the BRICS is especially worrying: China, India and Russia jointly bear 56% of the estimated global burden.[5] This is an immense weight on a country’s shoulders, especially as large income disparities persist and universal health care is by no More…

Changing the face of TB through the involvement of communities

Changing the face of TB through the involvement of communities

“Empower civil society and community representatives to generate change from the bottom up”, this is one of the key messages we took away from a session organised by the TB Europe Coalition and WHO Europe on “Community-driven solutions to the MDR-TB epidemic in the European region” at the Union Conference in Barcelona. Indeed, as civil society speaks the language of the people affected by the disease, and is well placed to take over numerous functions at the local level such as case detection, patient support, prevention activities, especially targeting affected communities, its capacities should be strengthened. There is no doubt that by providing basic services, making patients’ voices heard and spreading awareness about TB, civil society can be of great added value to national efforts. Speakers from civil society from Tajikistan and Moldova as well as the National TB Programmes of Bulgaria and Russia presented best practices in the involvement of communities and civil society in TB care. It was widely agreed that a clear shift from perceptions of TB as a medical condition to a human and social problem was urgently needed, especially in the way that conferences and trainings are organised for medical and programme staff. An equal More…

TB and the Poor: Time to Smooth out Global Inequalities.

TB and the Poor: Time to Smooth out Global Inequalities.

Today, the Minister of Health of India rightly noted that TB is a by-product of poverty “It’s not just that TB is in the air, it’s related to poverty, malnutrition, and to health systems which simply cannot cope with basic challenges”.[1]   This quote illustrates that TB is part of a more complex web of societal factors, which must be addressed in a broader development framework. Civil society will be relieved to hear that the MOH of India has committed to making TB a political priority and the responsibility of both politicians and medical administrators. As India still harbours the highest number of missed TB cases, the decision to implement local TB tracking systems will most definitely be welcomed. Furthermore, a foreseen ban which is to prevent the sale of anti-tuberculosis medicine at markets, should push patients to seek out professional medical help and consequently raise treatment rates. While it appears that serious efforts are being made towards reducing India’s TB burden, a glance at global statistics gives further reason for concern. Even if it was noted today that recent data on TB has increased both in quantity and quality, cases continue to be underreported due to weak health systems. This More…

Ringing the Alarm Bells: Worrying Trends for TB

Ringing the Alarm Bells: Worrying Trends for TB

While the recent WHO TB report gave some reason for optimism over a 1.5% drop in TB mortality, progress has been deemed insufficient. In fact, recent data reveals that the TB epidemic is far graver than we first thought and scores of TB patients continue to go untreated. It is thus that the term “waiting-to-die lists” was coined, as patients return home without treatment due to insufficient funds and drug stock-outs, consequently facing a death sentence and a threat to their families and communities. Moreover, in the European Region, multidrug-resistant TB remains an alarming problem. The participants at Monday’s Stop TB Partnership meeting agreed that our current target of cutting TB deaths by 95% is ambitious. However, given that we know how to treat TB and effective medicine is available, it is sufficient funding and an adequate involvement of communities, which will determine whether we meet our objective. TB Research and Development has typically been neglected, receiving only 676 million in 2013, thereby leaving a 1.3 billion USD funding gap every year. Moreover, pharmaceutical companies are increasingly closing TB research programmes as these no longer appear profitable. According to Colleen Daniels from the Treatment Action Group “TB R&D is starting More…

A Round Table on TB Determinants Held in Ukraine by the TBEC Member Group

A Round Table on TB Determinants Held in Ukraine by the TBEC Member Group

On October 2, 2014, the Public Movement ‘The Ukrainians Against TB’ has held a round table ‘Political, Economic, Social, Medical, Cultural and other Determinants of TB Epidemic in Ukraine’. The event was held at the premises of the International Renaissance Foundation. The goal of the round table was to bring together key TB experts from the state, non-governmental, academic, medical and other sectors of the society, representatives of donor organisations, mass media, to discuss the current determinants of the TB epidemic in Ukraine and develop recommendations to reform the state policy on TB and other socially dangerous diseases. This discussion was part of series of activities aimed at enabling a more effective national response to TB and other socially dangerous diseases, on the basis of multi-sectoral cooperation and multi-sectoral responsibility, with the anticipated outcome – the introduction of the legislative initiatives into the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine and lobbying the adoption of the legislative acts by the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine.   Among others, following topics were discussed at the round table: – Groups of high risk to TB, their size estimates, defining criteria for defining risk groups, – TB prevention among groups of risk as a part of More…

wink.pink